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So Close to Harvest October 9, 2011

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The soybeans are ready for harvest. The leaves have dried up and dropped off. The stems are dry and the pods are crisp. The beans themselves have changed from green to a golden yellow. The video will show a good look at our field before it is harvested.

Beans Tightly Packed in Pod September 8, 2011

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Looking across our Soybean Field

An early morning check of the field today shows the soybean plants are still green. In our area, we are just starting to see a few fields that are “turning”.  When farmers say “the field is turning”, they are referring to the plants starting to dry down and the plant will start to look yellow and brown.  As you can see, our whole field is still green.

3 beans tightly packed in pod

The BIGGEST change since our last update is how much the soybeans have grown.  We don’t mean the plants themselves (they are still approximately 3-feet high).  Rather the soybeans INSIDE the pods are much bigger.  The soybeans are as green as grass right now. When we harvest them, they will be golden yellow/brown. Take a look at the picture which shows how tight the three soybeans are lined up inside the pod.

Our area has continued to have regular rain falls.  All the crops (mostly soybeans and corn) in our local area look good.  Harvest is about a month away!    

Plants are loaded with pods

 

Pods are Filling Out August 22, 2011

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About the size of a small lima bean

The soybean plants may look the same but look closer. The soybeans in the pods are growing. In fact, the beans are green and about the size of a small lima bean. We’re still about six weeks away from harvest.

Rapid Pod Development August 8, 2011

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In less than a week, the soybean pods have had significant development.  While they are still very immature, we can definitely count an exact number of tiny soybeans in each pod.  

The largest soybean pods are 1.5-inches long.  Keep in mind the pods develop from the bottom of the plant to the top so the nods on the top of our plants are not showing any pod development yet but give them time.  

Small pods developing at the base of the plantsPods compared to a penny!Field continues to look GREAT!

SoybeanStatus: Full of Blooms and Forming Tiny Pods July 31, 2011

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Soybean Pod Just Starting to Grow compared to a Penny

We checked the field today and the soybeans look great.  Looking across the field we see a full canopy of healthy green leaves and good color.  A closer look at the plants show lots of tiny flower blooms. The blooms will develop into a pod and then fill with soybeans.  The pods are just starting to grow. So as we looked at it today, the pods are about the size of a penny.

Soybeans are Looking Great July 2, 2011

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It has been about three weeks since we planted our soybean field and the plants are looking great. Brandon McClure tells us what he looks for as an agronomy specialist — the field is clear of weeds and insect damage. The soybean plants are healthy and growing at a good rate. Although our soybean field was planted several weeks behind when we planned, we are very pleased with the soybean stand (plant population or number of plants per acre) and progress of the crop.

Since we shot the video 12 hours ago, our Follow Farming field has received a rain. The soybeans need moisture so this will keep them growing well.

Enjoy the July 4th Indendence Day holiday. We are thankful for all the freedoms of the USA and to be blessed with an abundant food supply.  The American farmer is proud to grow food for you and the world.

Soybean Plants Looking Healthy

Tillage Day – Preparing the Ground for Planting June 8, 2011

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It was a busy day at the Follow Farming field.  Local farmer, Mike Smith, tilled the ground preparing it for soybean planting.  Watch the videos below for:

  • An introduction about Field Tillage — What the farmer does and why they work the ground up.
  • Watch the tractor at work — See how the tractor moves, turns, and makes a little dust.
  • Notice the difference between Non-tilled vs. Tilled ground — Look up close how the dirt and weeds are different. 
  • Check out the tractor — Hear a quick explanation of the tractor, cultivator, and clumbler.

Wet Weather Planting Decisions May 31, 2011

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With this spring’s especially wet weather, farmers may be adjusting their planting decisions.  At our Follow Farming field we recently made the decision that instead of five acres of corn and five acres of soybeans, we are going to plant all soybeans.  Farmers are beginning to adjust because corn would typically get planted between April 15 and May 31 in our local area.

Crop insurance is a way that farmers manage risks.  Allen Douce of the Thomas Milligan Agency explains what crop insurance is and how farmers may utilize its many options.  This year has certainly required farmers to make and continually adjust their planting decisions.

Update on Field Conditions March 21, 2011

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A quick stop at the field today showed that field conditions are starting to dry out.  The soil is looking good. When we walked out on the field, there are areas which are soft enough that you sink in an inch.  A few small areas of the field are starting to dry out enough that the top layer of soil is dry.   As farmers, we are five to six weeks away from planting.  Field conditions look good and we have no concerns about the soil at this time.

The next few weeks will busy for farmers in the Marion, Ohio area.  This is the time of year farmers are:

  • getting seed (corn and soybeans) delivered to their farm or picked up from the seed dealer
  • finalizing nutrient, weed control, and pesticide plans for the field, and
  • preparing tractors, planters and other equipment for the spring season.